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Roto Reviews x Nicole Walker

Roto ReviewsNicole WalkerRecently, Rotos have been coming in and flying out of our warehouse again, and one of our wonderful customers, Nicole, has been playing a bunch of games on the Roto.


She’s been ever so kind to pull together a range of videos showcasing the games that can be played on Roto. You can see our little compilation video of clips below, however full videos can be found on her YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5NbW4IiIdT7TLkia39N4wA

Check out her reviews of games below!

RoboRecall: Playing RoboRecall in the RotoVR is a lot of fun – the rotation makes it easy to change directions and in combination with the teleporting you can move easily in the game. The Roto is very responsive with the head tracking. Make sure to look comfortably forward before enabling the head tracking, else you may end up turning unexpectedly.


One thing to note – please wear the safety straps on the controllers. I was too lazy to put them on and inadvertently got one stuck on the arm of the chair. Ha!

Vox Machinae:

To get native RotoVR support within the game, you must access the Beta version. (Please speak with us at Roto to get access to this!)


A few settings:


Haptics - settings -> controls -> haptics -> vibration fade -> slow

VR Rendering – settings -> video -> VR mirror -> render

Using: Thrustmaster T.Flight HOTAS 4 with Oculus Rift CV1.

The First Head-Mounted Displays – The Telesphere Mask and the Headsight. You might think that strapping a display on a person’s head is a relatively new idea, but it is not. The first head-mounted displays were developed as early as the 1960s. The Telesphere Mask was the first example of a head-mounted display, which provided 3D stereoscopic and wide vision with stereo sound. However, the device lacked certain immersion, because of it being a non-interactive medium. In 1961 two Philco Corporation engineers, Comeau and Bryan, came up with the Headsight. A head-mounted display, much like the Telesphere Mask, the Headsight featured magnetic motion tracking technology, which was connected to a close circuit camera. While the goggles can be named a precursor to modern virtual reality technology, they were not developed for entertainment purposes. Instead, they were developed for the military with the idea that a person would be able to immerse themselves in the remote viewing of dangerous situations.


This game and the RotoVR are practically meant for each other. Your movement in the chair is based upon the movement of your robot (not your head) thus allowing you to look around independently of your robot. The hepatics are specific to the actions in the game. I felt the rumble when I shot my weapons, when I was hit, and when my robot needed to reboot. This adds to the immersion of the game. You really do feel like you're driving this massive machine.

Boneworks:

The locomotion in BoneWorks would easily cause me motion sickness; however that was greatly reduced in the Roto. Since you move in the direction you are facing in the game, the chair makes it comfortable by headtracking and turning in tandem. With rumble on a low setting, it felt as if I were being pushed while sitting in a wheelchair.

The Lab:

This was the first time I’ve played this game with the Oculus. Once you position yourself in the right spot using the controller, its very easy to play in the chair. Movement is smooth. If you are in the right location on your tower, you can easily reach the fire to set your bows aflame. The only thing that took some adjusting to is looking over the tower ledge which is a habit if you are used to playing while standing. Just be careful not to lean too for forward and fall out of the chair, ha!

The VFX-1. We can’t do a list about the history of Virtual Reality and not include the VFX-1. Released in the middle of the 1990s, the VFX-1 system was one of the most capable virtual reality headsets released on the market at the time. With stereoscopic 3D, multi-axis head movement detection and rotation, and the ability to play games that were not truly supported by the system, the VFX-1 was the true Virtual Reality deal at the time. Furthermore, their price tag was relatively cheap compared to other products on the market, coming at a mere $600. However, the VFX-1 was too advanced of a technology and it didn’t really take off. Later on, the company Vuzix that made the glasses was bought by Forte Technologies, which released a more expensive VFX 3D version, but it also didn’t manage to achieve huge success.

Audica:

This game doesn’t have a lot of movement since you are primarily front facing. Extremely easy to play in the chair and with headtracking, the subtle left and right glances will move the chair. Adjusting to the gameplay in the chair is remarkably simple. Aside from your arms tiring, you could play for many hours.


We hope you enjoyed this weeks blog. As always, you can contact us on , , Instagram and Discord.
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